Effects of long term raw pig slurry inputs on nutrients and metals contamination of tropical volcanogenic soils, Uvéa Island (South Pacific).

TitreEffects of long term raw pig slurry inputs on nutrients and metals contamination of tropical volcanogenic soils, Uvéa Island (South Pacific).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsGunkel-Grillon, P, ROTH, E, Laporte-Magoni, C, Lemestre, M
JournalThe Science of the Total Environment
Volume533
Start Page339
Pagination339-346
Date Published2015
Mots-clésContamination Factor, Family Pig breeding, Heavy metals, Leaching risk, Metal mobility, Nutrients, Pig slurry, Tropical soils
Abstract

In small Polynesian islands, family pig breeding is usually conducted without recovery of pig slurry. Raw pig slurry is spread onto the soil without any treatment. So far, most of the studies were carried out in temperate climate and for industrial digested pig slurry applications on agricultural lands. In the present case study, conducted in Uvéa Island, the aim is to determine if long term application of raw pig slurry on tropical soils, naturally rich in heavy metals has a significant influence on elements concentrations and mobility. Two types of tropical soils and two pig breeding systems, pig enclosure on small concrete pens or pig enclosure in large land pens, were investigated. Here we demonstrate that raw pig slurry inputs on soils can lead to an increase of total nitrogen and phosphorus content with high Contamination Factors. The pollution load index values (1.3; 5.3; 2.5; 2.3) were indicative of multi-heavy metals pollution (Fe, Mn, Al, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni) in mixed calcareous soils of the coastal area and they are exchangeable while they are immobilized or less mobile in inland pure ferralitic soils. For mixed calcareous soils of the coastal area, family pig breeding represents a drainage risk of soluble species (phosphorus, inorganic nitrogen, Fe, Mn, Al, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni). For inland ferralitic soils, family pig breeding is more compatible with a sustainable management of the environment in Uvéa Island and by extension in volcanic tropical islands with respect to the investigated chemical elements.